Siemens & Halske Geheimschreiber T52b

This is a teleprinter cryptograph: So once two connected machines are set up, the cipher clerk at one machine types the plain text while the other machine prints out the plain text. However, the transmission itself is encrypted! For the actual transmission, a 5 bit code invented by E. Baudot was used. To allow the transmission of more then 32 characters, there are two different character sets: Letters and Figures. Two characters are used to switch from one to the other.
Note that the cipher text is normally not printed. CipherClerk's Applet generates a textual representation of the transmitted signals. Baudot code contains some non-printable characters. CipherClerk's Applet emits plain ASCII characters for these symbols, too.
 
 Letter 
 
space
Q
W
E
R
T
Y
U
I
O
P
cr
A
S
D
 Figure 
 
space
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
cr
-
bell
$
ciphertext
~
_
Q
W
E
R
T
Y
U
I
O
P
<
A
S
Bit 1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
Bit 2
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
Bit 3
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
Bit 4
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
Bit 5
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
Note: the <bell> symbol in the plain text is represented by '}'.
 
 Letter 
F
G
H
J
K
L
lf
Z
X
C
V
B
N
M
ltrs
figs
 Figure 
!
&
#
'
(
)
lf
"
/
:
;
?
,
.
ltrs
figs
ciphertext
 F
G
H
J
K
L
>
Z
X
C
V
B
N
M
^
|
Bit 1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
Bit 2
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
Bit 3
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
Bit 4
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Bit 5
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
 
 To encipher, the machine used 10 pin wheels. Using a plug board, five of them where chosen to invert the bits of the plain text letter. In the same way, then the other five where used to generate a transposition of the bits. The transposition was generated by exchanging five time to bits: 5-1, 4-5, 3-4, 2-3, 1-2.
After encrypting one letter, all ten pin wheels stepped forward once. The all wheels had a different number of pins ranging from 47 to 73. As the pin numbers where chosen to have no factor in common, their bit pattern would repeat after 47*53*...*71*73 (= an awfully large number, some 17 digits) characters.

If you are interested in this machine, I'd like to point you attention to Toby's Cryptopage. I found the pin-wheel data at Cipher machines of the Second World War . From Frode Weierud you may download a translation of a paper by Lars Ulfving: The Geheimschreiber Secret, Arne Beurling and the success of Swedish signals intelligence


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